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Table 4 Distribution of responses

From: Recognition and management of abdominal compartment syndrome among German pediatric intensivists: results of a national survey

Question Stated question and choices Answers (%)
B.1 Occurrence and relevance of IAH/ACS in clinical practice  
     • Never 54 (67/123)
     • Seldom 39 (48/123)
     • Regularly 6 (7/123)
     • Often 1 (1/123)
  Decade of first-time diagnosing IAH/ACS:  
     • Before 1980 2 (1/45)
     • 1980 to 1989 4 (2/45)
     • 1990 to 1999 40 (18/45)
     • 2000 to 2009 53 (24/45)
B.2 Awareness of current WSACS-definitions (tested by free text)  
     • principle of IAH definition correctly described (increased IAP) 43 (21/49)
     • principle of ACS definition correctly described (IAH + organ dysfunction) 35 (17/49)
  Stated IAP thresholds for IAH  
     • IAP ≥ 10 mmHg 42 (5/12)
     • IAP ≥ 12 mmHg 25 (3/12)
     • IAP ≥ 15 mmHg 25 (3/12)
     • IAP ≥ 20 mmHg 8 (1/12)
B.3 Frequency of diagnosed IAH at answering ICUs in 2009  
     • 0 times IAH 64 (79/124)
     • 1 to 10 times IAH 30 (37/124)
     • > 10 times IAH 6 (7/124)
  Frequency of diagnosed ACS at answering ICUs in 2009  
     • 0 times ACS 75 (93/124)
     • 1 to 5 times ACS 24 (30/124)
     • > 5 times ACS 1 (1/124)
  Distribution of causes of ACS  
     • Primary ACS 45 (16/35)
     • Secondary ACS 49 (17/35)
     • Not distinguishable 6 (2/35)
B.5 Awareness and use of current WSACS definitions (tested by multiple choice)  
     • IAH definition correctly chosen (increased IAP) 4 (5/124)
     • ACS definition correctly chosen (increased IAP + new organ dysfunction) 17 (22/124)
  Clinical symptoms stated to be associated with increased IAP in children  
     • Oliguria to anuria 20 (33/169)
     • From peritonism, to peritonitis, and to acute abdomen 15 (26/169)
     • Abdominal distension 14 (24/169)
     • Hemodynamic insufficiency 14 (24/169)
     • Respiratory insufficiency 12 (20/169)
     • Organ dysfunction (including ileus) 11 (19/169)
     • Radiologic findings 8 (13/169)
     • Impaired venous reflux to increased central venous pressure 5 (8/169)
     • Others 1 (1/169)
B.6 Share of respondents stating to measure IAP regularly 20 (25/125)
  Stated reasons for not measuring IAP  
     • Clinical diagnosis (IAP measurement not necessary) 48 (48/100)
     • Lack of technical equipment 42 (42/100)
     • Lack of therapeutical consequence 11 (11/100)
     • Fear for invasiveness 9 (9/100)
     • Fear for infection 5 (5/100)
     • Fear for additional expenditure 5 (5/100)
  Frequency of measurements among those who stated to measure IAP  
     • once per day 31 (7/23)
     • two times per day 17 (4/23)
     • three to four times per day 17 (4/23)
     • Continuously (or more than four times per day) 35 (8/23)
     • In cases of clinical signs of IAH or ACS 70 (16/23)
     • In cases of organ dysfunction or failure 17 (4/23)
B.7 Predominantly used indirect IAP measurement methods  
     • via intra-vesical pressure 96 (24/25)
     • via intra-gastric pressure 24 (6/25)
     • via PIP (PIP increase is a consequence of IAH) 16 (4/25)
     • via central venous pressure 4 (1/25)
  Predominantly used direct IAP measurement methods  
     • via Spiegelberg® probea (modified brain pressure probe) 4 (1/25)
     • via CAPD catheter 4 (1/25)
     • via surgical drainage 4 (1/25)
     • via intra-abdominal placed cardiac catheter 4 (1/25)
B.8 Share of respondents who stated they would measure IAP more often if the procedure and technical requirements became easier and more standardized 68 (60/88)
B.12 Share of respondents having performed at least one decompressive laparotomy in 2009 20 (26/127)
  Stated survival rate of ACS patients in 2009  
     • Surgically treated children 88 (18/20)
     • Non-surgically treated children 71 (5/7)
  Share of respondents who would surgically decompress again (if indicated) 100 (26/26)
  1. CAPD, continuous abdominal peritoneal dialysis; PIP, peak inspiratory pressure. aSpiegelberg KG, Hamburg, Germany.